RE/MAX 440
Mary Mastroeni
mmastroeni@remax.net
Mary Mastroeni
731 W Skippack Pike
Blue Bell  PA 19422
PH: 610-277-2900
O: 215-643-3200
C: 610-213-4878
F: 267-354-6212 
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Mary's Blog

Interested in an HOA? What You Need to Know before Signing the Dotted Line

November 19, 2015 12:19 pm

When it comes to buying a house, prospective buyers have a lot to consider. From the home’s price to its location and distance to work and play, there are numerous factors that need to come together in order to successfully make your way through the process. But many house hunters often overlook the cost and rules that come along with a homeowners association.
 
In its simplest definition, an HOA is a legal entity that manages a shared housing complex, whether it’s a condo building, a row of townhouses or a suburban housing development with shared space. While not every new home is affiliated with an HOA, many communities are, making this one area that can’t be overlooked when it comes to making a decision.
 
The easiest way to determine if a home you’re looking at is part of an HOA is to ask your agent or look closely at the listing yourself. The last thing you want is to be saddled with unexpected fees once you move into a new space.
 
When it comes to the cost associated with an HOA, it’s important to remember that it varies. Most homeowners associations collect monthly dues and use the money to fund activities that everyone in the community can take part in such as Halloween parties for the kids or a neighborhood wine and cheese night. This may be a great selling point for a new family moving into the area, but make sure you can afford the dues before signing the dotted line.
 
In a condo or townhome setting, the money from an HOA goes toward common elements such as landscaping, snow removal, fencing, mailboxes and entry gates. HOA fees can also be used to pay for the development’s security, maintain a shared swimming pool or playground and manage a shared septic system.
 
If you’re looking at properties that are part of an HOA, keep in mind that you can’t simply come and go from the association as you please. If you buy a property with an HOA, you’re required to be a part of it. While the structure of an association can vary depending on the total number of members, most have a president, treasurer and some elected board members.
 
Aside from the fees associated with an HOA, there may also be rules about what color you’re allowed to paint your door, the type of mailbox you can have, or even where you must place your garbage pails. If you consistently break the rules, you may be fined. 
 
An HOA also has a say in whether you can do certain remodeling projects such as building a deck or adding a swimming pool.
 
There are many benefits associated with purchasing a home that’s part of an HOA, but before making a final decision, make sure you understand everything that’s required. 
 
To learn more about homeowners associations, contact our office today.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Improving Real Estate Market Offers Much to be Thankful for This Holiday Season

November 19, 2015 12:19 pm

Going through the home-selling process can be a challenging proposition for everyone involved, but as we enter the holiday season, it’s important to take a step back and remember that there’s a lot to be thankful for—even if your home is still on the market.
 
Even if the process hasn’t gone as smoothly as you had hoped, be thankful that you still have a home to sell. There are millions of people throughout the country who don’t have a home to call their own, and many millennials are still living in their parents’ basement. During the holiday season especially, be grateful that you have a roof over your head, as well as for the fact that once you sell, you’ll most likely have another. 
 
The improving economy is another reason to be thankful this holiday season. As the economy continues to improve, so too does the housing market, making it a good time to have a home listed as the market appears to be performing better than it has over the last three years. 
 
It’s also important to pay thanks to the fact that we live in a world where technological advancements make it easier than ever to show your home to prospective buyers. The Internet, mobile phones and tablets have made showcasing your house as easy as clicking a button. Plus, advancements in cameras and videos can work to your advantage when it comes to highlighting your home more beautifully than ever.
 
More often than not, when people take a step back and examine their lives and think about all that they have, they become more charitable—something that can help when preparing for a sale. Giving away clothes or items that you no longer use/need will eliminate some of the clutter from your home and go a long way toward helping others.
 
And last but not least, be thankful that you’re working with a savvy real estate professional who can seamlessly guide you through the process. Today’s agents work hard to ensure your home is properly marketed to everyone out there, and more often than not, you’re not seeing everything that goes on behind the scenes. In fact, recent research from the National Association of REALTORS® shows that houses are selling faster and for more money today, a feat that couldn’t be achieved without real estate professionals who are at the top of their game.
 
Contact our office today for more reasons to give thanks this holiday season.  

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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In this Edition: Homeowners Insurance

November 19, 2015 12:19 pm

Our lead story in this month’s Home Matters examines the many reasons we have to be thankful as we head into this year’s holiday season. Other topics covered this month include what you need to know before purchasing a home that’s part of a homeowners association and simple ways to get your home in tip-top shape when looking to sell quickly. We hope you enjoy this month’s edition of Home Matters and as always, we welcome your feedback. Email us anytime!

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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5 Ways to Prepare Your Deck for Winter

November 18, 2015 2:40 pm

(Family Features) Foot traffic, summer storms, scorching heat, high humidity—your deck has seen it all this summer. But did you know colder months can also bring a slew of wearing elements?

According to Wood. It’s Real., funded by the Southern Pine Awareness Network (SPAN), an information clearing house for homeowners, snow, ice, wet slush and lack of sunlight can cause significant damage to your deck if left unattended. To stave off this damage—and avoid replacement altogether—Wood. It’s Real. recommends:

• Packing. Now is the time to do some seasonal de-cluttering. Store items such as planters, which can cause decay and discoloration if they remain on the deck all winter, and put away furniture and cushions you don't expect to use until warmer weather returns.

• Cleaning. Use a power washer to remove accumulated dirt and any signs of staining or damage, such as mildew. Remember that cleaning isn't just about appearance; it's also about protecting the woodwork. Be sure to wash both the top and bottom of the deck.

• Inspecting and repairing. Inspect your deck for signs of wear and tear from the warmer months and make any necessary repairs or upgrades. If your deck falls into disrepair, replace boards or the entire deck using a cost-effective wood (such as Southern Yellow Pine) that resists the aging process.

• Protecting. You can easily test whether it's time to add a protective coating to your deck by checking whether water beads or soaks into the wood. You may be able to spot treat with waterproofing or stain by sanding the affected areas and reapplying. However, if the problem area is widespread or you can't remember the last time you stained or waterproofed the entire deck, it's probably time to do it again.

• Maintaining. Shovel snow regularly using a plastic shovel—metal shovels can ding and gouge wood. Use sand rather than salt or ice melt products that can harm the surface of your deck, and be sure to brush off any excess after melting.

Source: Wood. It’s Real.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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The Leading Causes of Home Fires

November 18, 2015 2:40 pm

Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Eve are peak days for home fires—and the leading causes are cooking a holiday meal or burning decorative candles, reports the National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA).

"These statistics are a serious reminder of how the excitement of holiday entertaining can quickly turn into a life-altering fire or even a tragic injury or death," says Sue Steen, chief executive officer of Servpro Industries, Inc. "While glowing candles and elaborate meals set the stage for a great holiday get-together, homeowners need to exercise extra care in controlling the dangerous potential for fires."

According to the NFPA, unattended cooking is by far the leading cause of home cooking fires, with frying posing the greatest fire risk and electric ranges posing a higher risk than gas ranges. Range top cooking in general starts the majority of home cooking fires.

Candles are another leading cause of home fires. Unattended or abandoned candles account for a large portion of candle fires—almost 20 percent—but the most frequent cause of candle fires is placing the candle too close to something that can burn, like curtains, decorations or furniture.

To keep your family and home safe from fire, remain vigilant as to its causes, even amid holiday celebrations, Steen says.

Source: SERVPRO®

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Study: Solar Energy Systems Boost Home Values

November 18, 2015 2:40 pm

Considering a solar-powered home? Your dollars will be well spent. According to a recent study produced by the Appraisal Institute, “Appraising Into the Sun: Six-State Solar Home Paired-Sales Analysis,” homes with host-owned solar photovoltaic energy systems are sold at a premium compared to homes without PV systems.

Appraisal Institute researchers concluded the location, age, size and efficiency must be considered in determining the value of a PV system. The value also is impacted by local factors, such as the retail cost of electricity and any local incentives provided for those who own a PV system.

The study, released by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, compared comparable sales of 43 homes in six states: California, Florida, Maryland, North Carolina, Oregon and Pennsylvania. For each of the properties, researchers generated contributory-value estimates based on gross cost (PV cost before incentives), net cost (PV cost after incentives) and income (value of energy savings from PV systems, calculated using the PV Value® tool).

Source: Appraisal Institute

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Beware the Grinch: Don't Fall for Seasonal Scams

November 17, 2015 2:40 pm

Holiday scammers will be out in full force now that giving season is approaching—and unfortunately, according to a recent report by the AARP, many are unaware of the warning signs. In fact, 70 percent of those surveyed for the report incorrectly answered questions pertaining to some of the most common seasonal scams, including those related to charitable giving and gift cards.

“While most of us focus on family and friends during the holidays, fraudsters are zeroing in on our wallets and bank accounts,” says AARP Chief Advocacy & Engagement Officer Nancy LeaMond. “We’re encouraging consumers to elevate their awareness of some emerging and popular scams, and to also share the information with their families to help keep them safe this holiday season.”

Last year, Americans gave $358 billion dollars to charity, according to the National Philanthropic Trust. Government officials who regulate charities and fundraisers say that while most charities are legitimate, there are many fundraisers, especially telemarketers, who keep 85-90 percent of the money they raise. 

According to the AARP report, 70 percent of those who donated to a charity or fundraiser in the past 12 months did so without asking any questions about how that donation would be spent, and 60 percent made donations without verifying the charity groups were legally authorized to raise money in their state.

To ensure your donation goes to its intended recipient, keep in mind that in most states, professional fundraisers must be registered with the Office of the State Secretary, and also report how much they raise and how much goes to the charitable purpose.

Additionally, just 54 percent of report respondents know that gift cards purchased from a gift rack at a big box store, pharmacy or grocery store are not safer from hackers or thieves than those purchased online. In fact, scammers often visit these locations, secretly write down or electronically scan the numbers off the cards, then check online or call the toll-free number to see if someone has bought the cards and activated them. As soon as a card is active, the scammers drain the funds. By the time you try to use the same card, the money is long gone. 

Nearly two-thirds of holiday shoppers surveyed also say they will buy holiday gifts using a debit card, despite recommendations to the contrary. Remember: with credit cards, you are liable for only up to $50 of fraudulent use. In the case of a lost or stolen debit card, financial losses can be much more significant.

Source: AARP

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Smart Home Tech a Global Affair

November 17, 2015 2:40 pm

Smart home technology has taken root in the U.S. and across several countries—and according to a recent report by international market research firm GfK, many of these countries embrace the technology primarily for its safety applications.

In fact, more than half (55 percent) of countries surveyed by GfK, including the U.S., believe smart home technology’s greatest appeal is “security” and “control.” “Energy” and “lighting” came second, followed by “entertainment,” “connectivity” and “health.”

The research also found, however, that barriers to smart home technology exist, regardless of location. The leading barriers across all countries, U.S. included, are price and privacy concerns—indicative of apprehension over recent data breaches and the overall global economy.

Source: GfK

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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3 Fresh Takes on Holiday Décor

November 17, 2015 2:40 pm

(BPT)—Does your holiday décor need a reboot? Take a cue from this year’s top trends, says Kirsty Froelich, design director of The Tile Shop.

"Red and green will always be classic, but when it comes to holiday décor, rules are meant to be broken," says Froelich. "Anyone can use inventive color schemes, fun patterns and smart home updates to create spaces that embrace the essence of the season."

Trends to consider, Froelich says, are ones that blend holiday tradition with modern aesthetic. These include:

1. Festive Florals – Fresh or dry floral arrangements are a simple way to adorn your home with holiday cheer. To switch up traditional evergreens or poinsettia, consider blooms in hues of rich purple, crisp white and funky fuchsia. Place a small arrangement on a bathroom vanity to add warmth and color—perfect for those hosting guests.

2. Beautiful Backsplashes – Think tiling a backsplash is too difficult? Think again. Instantly transforming the look of a kitchen or bar space, installing a fresh backsplash is a relatively inexpensive DIY project that can be completed over a weekend. Finish the project before the thick of the holiday season to really reap the benefits.

"There's no better time to let your home shine than the holidays," says Froelich. "Adding holiday greenery, a few metallic touches and whimsical window updates will make your home feel festive. Now's the perfect time to get that tile project done that's been on the back burner, so you can show off your hard work and the amazing new space to all visitors."

3. Wowing Windows – Don’t overlook your windows when adding holiday touches to your home. Visit your local craft store, pick out a bolt or two of fabric that blends with your holiday aesthetic, and have the appropriate lengths cut. Then simply drape and enjoy!

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Got Student Loans? 5 Tips to Avoid Default

November 16, 2015 2:40 pm

Most students begin the process of paying back their student loans within six months of graduation, but rising tuition costs and a tepid job market have made many unable to meet the terms of repayment. If this is the case for you, it’s important to consult with your lender about deferment or forbearance, say the experts at the nonprofit organization American Consumer Credit Counseling (ACCC).

“Student loan repayment is not something you want to put off,” says Steve Trumble president and CEO of ACCC. “Delinquency and default destroy credit and can create problems that follow you throughout your life—making it more difficult to secure a loan or rent an apartment. In some cases, defaulting also allows the government to intercept your tax refunds or garnish your wages or retirement benefits. Defaulting on a student loan is the worst scenario, and it’s important that consumers speak to their lenders before it gets to that point.”

Depending on their line of work or financial situation, a student may be eligible for student loan forgiveness. In order for a loan to be discharged, the borrower must be experiencing circumstances beyond their control.

To better manage repayment of your student loans and avoid default, ACCC recommends:

1. Understanding your loans and loan agreements – It is important to understand the types of student loans you have, the variety of student loan repayment options available, and different programs offered to federal and private loan borrowers. Read your promissory note, which is a legal document. 

2. Making payments on time – Making payments on time is not only the best way to avoid default and eventually pay off your loan; it’s an excellent way to build credit. Building good credit will help when it comes time to make a big purchase, such as buying a house. 

3. Creating a budget – Create a post-college budget that includes all expenses, from credit card payments to utilities and groceries. By creating a budget and sticking to it, you can ensure enough savings to be able to pay your loans on time. 

4. Keeping good records and tracking your loans – Track all payment schedules and keep a paper record of every monthly payment. Utilize the ability to manage your loans online in order to stay up to date. 

5. Addressing any financial challenges quickly – If you’re having trouble making your monthly payment, don’t wait to address the problem. Research your options and talk to your lender. A borrower is usually considered in default if he or she has failed to make a loan payment for 270 days or more. Don’t let it get to that point. You may be able to switch repayment plans, consider an income-driven repayment plan, change a payment due date, or secure a deferment or forbearance.

Source: ACCC

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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