RE/MAX 440
Mary Mastroeni
mmastroeni@remax.net
Mary Mastroeni
731 W Skippack Pike
Blue Bell  PA 19422
PH: 610-277-2900
O: 215-643-3200
C: 610-213-4878
F: 267-354-6212 
Welcome Home from RE/MAX 440!

Mary's Blog

How to Tackle Family Tension When it Comes to Alzheimer's Disease

June 9, 2017 12:36 am

Alzheimer’s disease impacts an estimated 5.5 million Americans today. But when it comes to the family members impacted by the disease, that number bounces to 15 million. This includes partners, children, and other extended family who are caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s.

New findings from an Alzheimer's Association survey show that people greatly fear becoming a burden to their caregivers as they age. Despite this, many have not planned accordingly, and this (when combined with the stress of an Alzheimer's diagnosis) can be overwhelming for caretakers.  and the stress of caregiving – especially alone–can be extremely overwhelming.  

The Alzheimer's Association offers various tips for families of Alzheimer’s patients.

Lend an ear. Dealing with a progressive disease such as Alzheimer's can be stressful — and not everyone reacts the same way. Give each family member an opportunity to share their opinion. Avoid blaming or attacking each other, as this will only cause more hurt.

Divide and conquer. Make a list of responsibilities and address how much time, money and effort may be involved. Divide tasks according to family members' preferences and abilities. The Alzheimer's Association online Care Team Calendar can help you coordinate.

Talk it out. Discuss if current methods of care are working and if the needs of the person with Alzheimer's are being met; make modifications as needed. Plan for the challenges you can anticipate as the disease progresses.

Stick together. Support family members and connect with others who are dealing with similar situations.  

Seek outside support. Sometimes, an outside perspective can help the entire family take a step back and work through difficult issues. The Alzheimer's Association 24/7 multi-lingual Helpline (800.272.3900) is staffed with care consultants who can help anytime, day or night.

Source: The Alzheimer's Association

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Tips for Exercising in Warm Weather

June 9, 2017 12:36 am

Whether you’re a cycling junkie or a road runner, if you exercise outdoors, warmer weather will likely impact your summer fitness schedule. But when it comes to adjusting your workout for summer, you should do more than switch from pants to shorts. As summer draws near, people exercising outdoors – from newcomers to top athletes – should make adjustments or their workouts could suffer, says Marni Sumbal, a prominent exercise physiologist and board-certified sports dietitian.

Here are 5 of Sumbal's suggestions to train smart in hot weather:

Reduce the intensity, stay inside or work out during off-peak hours. For the first month of hot weather, scale back until your body adjusts to the heat. Pushing too hard too soon can lead to fatigue or injuries.

If you don't want to reduce the intensity, work out either early in the morning or later in the evening, when the sun is down. You can also spend at least part of the workout indoors.

Hydrate. You will sweat more in the summer, which can cause headaches, nausea or fatigue. During a 60-minute workout, drink 20 to 28 ounces of either water or a sports drink. Sports drinks can be especially helpful because they contain carbohydrates (Sumbal recommends consuming at least 30 to 60 grams) as well as electrolytes (consume at least 400 milligrams of sodium). Afterward, she suggests either tart cherry juice to help with inflammation or orange juice that quenches thirst and contains potassium.

Warm up. Do some dynamic stretches (movements while stretching) to activate the muscles, increase the blood flow and to get full range of motion.

Cool down. Take a cold bath (not ice) or a put a cold rag around your neck to reduce the body's temperature. This helps you recover quicker by lowering your heart rate and increasing your appetite.

Soak in Epsom salt. This repairs muscle damage and offsets delayed inflammation. About an hour after the cold shower, add 2 cups of Epsom salt to a lukewarm bath.

"We really want to make sure the magnesium is absorbed, so soak for 20 to 40 minutes," Sumbal says.

If a bath isn't an option, she recommends scrubbing Epsom salt into your skin during a shower.

Source: TriMarni Coaching and Nutrition

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Choose a New Air Conditioner

June 9, 2017 12:36 am

Looking for a new AC unit to cool those long summer days? There may be more involved than you think. Selecting the right air conditioner for your home requires an understanding of more than just price range. You also need to think about the unit’s power use, the size of the space it will be cooling, and more.  

Follow these steps from The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers to choose the AC that's best for you:

Check your measurements: Figure out how much cooling power you need by determining the square footage of your room. Measure your window as well and take the measurements with you when you shop. Both portable and room air conditioners need to be connected to a window, and it's important to make sure it will fit before you bring your new AC unit home. Finally, if you're buying a portable air conditioner, consider whether the size of the unit is appropriate for the room.

Choose your capacity: Air conditioner capacity is measured in BTU (British thermal units). Check the unit labeling as you shop. You'll likely see a chart with BTU and the appropriate room size for cooling. Choose a size appropriate for the room or rooms you'll be cooling.  If you are placing the unit in a kitchen, sunny room, or room with high ceilings, you may need to size up.  Some manufacturers may also have capacity information available on its website.

Frigid features: Smart technology is being incorporated into portable air conditioners. Some units can be turned on or off via smartphone or tablet, so you can come home to a cooler space on a hot summer day. Others offer a "follow-me" function that measures the temperature both at the location of the unit and of the remote control. If you're sitting across the room from the unit and holding the remote control, the unit will take the temperature in the remote into account and adjust its output based on both temperatures. Other features you might find are programmable timers and alerts that tell you when the AC filter needs to be changed.

Source: AHAM,  www.aham.org.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Your Health: Preventing Diabetes

June 8, 2017 12:36 am

Diabetes, a metabolic disease that causes the body to produce too little insulin, is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Insulin allows the glucose, or sugar, from the foods that you eat to enter your cells and become energy. Diabetics don’t produce enough insulin to make this happen, and the lack of insulin takes a toll on every organ in the body.

But scientists tell us that a daily diet including certain foods can stimulate the body’s manufacture of insulin, helping to maintain healthy blood sugar levels and prevent a disease that is rapidly on the rise:

Whole grains – While the refined carbs in white bread and rice cause spikes in blood sugar, the bran and fiber in whole grains slow the breakdown of glucose. The lower glycemic load can dramatically reduce the risk of diabetes.

Carrots – Carrots are rich in the antioxidants called carotenoids. A study by University of Minnesota School of Public Health found that of 4,500 people tested over a 15-year span, those who had the highest levels of carotenoids in their blood cut their diabetes risk in half.

Green leafy vegetables – The study further found that veggies like spinach and kale, or even broccoli or cauliflower, can result in a 14 percent decrease in the risk of type 2 diabetes,  the most common type affecting adults.

Blueberries – The sweet berries have both insoluble and soluble fiber that help with blood sugar control and lowering blood glucose levels.

Sunflower seeds – They are a great source of copper, vitamin E, selenium, magnesium, and zinc, and their fat content is also helpful in preventing diabetes – as is the magnesium in this tiny seed.

Beans – Legumes are rich in complex carbohydrates, fiber, and protein. Because they digest slowly in your system, beans can help ensure that your blood sugar stays stable.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Weather the Storm Wisely

June 8, 2017 12:36 am

(Family Features)--Summer storm season may bring welcome rain, but some storms are strong enough to pack a dangerous punch. Planning ahead for this year's wicked weather can help ensure you're ready to weather whatever Mother Nature throws at you.

One of the most serious side effects of severe weather is the potential for power loss. In some cases, it can be just a nuisance with little more impact than the time it takes to reset clocks. However, when the outage lasts for hours or days, or when you rely on power for necessities like medical equipment, a power outage can be a major imposition.

Make sure your family is ready for any bad weather ahead this season with these tips:

- Ensure there is a working flashlight in every room, so you can safely navigate no matter what time of day the power fails or where you are. Check the battery terminals for any signs of damage or corrosion, and replace old batteries to give you the fullest charge possible. Also invest in a quality lantern or two, so if you have to hunker down for a while, you can do so with the comfort of some far-reaching light. After all, reading or playing board games is no fun by flashlight.

- If you have advance warning of a coming storm, unplug devices that are especially susceptible to power-related damage, such as TVs and computers. In the event of storms that crop up suddenly or while you're away from home, it's best to keep major electronics like TVs, computers and printers plugged into a surge protector to prevent damage from flickering power or a surge when the power is restored.

- Add a backup power source. Portable generators can provide essential power during a sustained power outage. An option like the Briggs & Stratton Q6500 QuietPower Series inverter generator delivers plenty of power to keep essential appliances and electronics running for up to 14 hours on a single tank of gas.

- Keep a ready supply of non-perishable snacks and drinks. Once the power goes out, you'll want to avoid opening the refrigerator, which releases trapped cold air and reduces the amount of time food will store safely without spoiling. After most perishables are exposed to temperatures over 40 F for two hours, you'll need to discard them, though a full, sealed freezer can hold its temperature for up to 48 hours.

- During a storm, keep the family together in one safe location. That way you can quickly communicate if you need to make an abrupt change, such as taking more protective cover. It also minimizes the possibility of injury from making your way through the home in the dark trying to locate family members.

Severe seasonal storms are the norm across many parts of the country. Planning ahead for potential problems, like power outages, can help ensure you weather the storm safely.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Weather the Storm Wisely

June 8, 2017 12:36 am

(Family Features)--Summer storm season may bring welcome rain, but some storms are strong enough to pack a dangerous punch. Planning ahead for this year's wicked weather can help ensure you're ready to weather whatever Mother Nature throws at you.

One of the most serious side effects of severe weather is the potential for power loss. In some cases, it can be just a nuisance with little more impact than the time it takes to reset clocks. However, when the outage lasts for hours or days, or when you rely on power for necessities like medical equipment, a power outage can be a major imposition.

Make sure your family is ready for any bad weather ahead this season with these tips:

- Ensure there is a working flashlight in every room, so you can safely navigate no matter what time of day the power fails or where you are. Check the battery terminals for any signs of damage or corrosion, and replace old batteries to give you the fullest charge possible. Also invest in a quality lantern or two, so if you have to hunker down for a while, you can do so with the comfort of some far-reaching light. After all, reading or playing board games is no fun by flashlight.

- If you have advance warning of a coming storm, unplug devices that are especially susceptible to power-related damage, such as TVs and computers. In the event of storms that crop up suddenly or while you're away from home, it's best to keep major electronics like TVs, computers and printers plugged into a surge protector to prevent damage from flickering power or a surge when the power is restored.

- Add a backup power source. Portable generators can provide essential power during a sustained power outage. An option like the Briggs & Stratton Q6500 QuietPower Series inverter generator delivers plenty of power to keep essential appliances and electronics running for up to 14 hours on a single tank of gas.

- Keep a ready supply of non-perishable snacks and drinks. Once the power goes out, you'll want to avoid opening the refrigerator, which releases trapped cold air and reduces the amount of time food will store safely without spoiling. After most perishables are exposed to temperatures over 40 F for two hours, you'll need to discard them, though a full, sealed freezer can hold its temperature for up to 48 hours.

- During a storm, keep the family together in one safe location. That way you can quickly communicate if you need to make an abrupt change, such as taking more protective cover. It also minimizes the possibility of injury from making your way through the home in the dark trying to locate family members.

Severe seasonal storms are the norm across many parts of the country. Planning ahead for potential problems, like power outages, can help ensure you weather the storm safely.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Could Your Body Language Be Sabotaging Your Hiring Potential?

June 8, 2017 12:36 am

You meet the criteria, you apply for a gig and you land an interview. But somehow, you keep missing out on the job. Sound familiar? When it comes to landing a job, what you say to a prospective employer may sometimes be less important than how you say it, according to a recent survey from staffing firm OfficeTeam, where senior managers said 30 percent of candidates display negative body language during interviews.

Respondents identified eye contact as the most telling nonverbal cue when meeting with applicants, rating it a 4.18 on a scale of one to five (with five indicating the highest significance). This was followed by facial expressions (3.96).

OfficeTeam offers job seekers five tips for putting their best body language forward during interviews:

Get hands-on. Aim for a handshake that's firm, but doesn't crush the recipient. Limit the duration to a few seconds.

Break out of that slump. Subtly mirror the interviewer's body language and posture. Sit up straight and lean forward slightly to show engagement and confidence.

Put on a happy face. A genuine smile demonstrates warmth and enthusiasm. Conduct a mock interview with a friend to find out if you're unwittingly sending negative nonverbal cues.

Keep your eyes on the prize. Maintain regular eye contact during the meeting, but look away occasionally. Staring may be perceived as aggressive.  

Don't fidget. Resist the urge to shake your legs, tap your fingers or twirl your pen. It's fine to use hand gestures, as long as they're not distracting. Keep your arms uncrossed to appear more open and receptive.

Source: OfficeTeam

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Minimize Moving Stress

June 7, 2017 12:36 am

Among the top stressors is packing. In fact, in a recent survey, commissioned by Duck® brand, conducted online by Harris Poll, 86 percent say packing to move is frustrating. It doesn't have to be this way. Here are some tips to reduce packing pain.

Purge before packing: Diminish the workload by first cleaning out items you no longer need.

Pack carefully: 40 percent of those who would find it frustrating to pack when moving worry about items breaking. Eliminate anxiety by wrapping fragile items with cushioning material, like Bubble Wrap. Dish and glass kits provide pouches and dividers to protect delicate goods. Lastly, secure your boxes with quality packing tape, like EZ Start® Packaging Tape or Duck® MAX Strength Packaging Tape.

Plan ahead: Before you even think about boxing up or hiring movers, take some time to plan in advance. If you need help figuring out exactly what and how many supplies you need to pack up your home, Duck® brand has a new online moving calculator at duckbrand.com. All you have to do is input the number of bedrooms and bathrooms you have, as well as any other rooms and spaces you are packing up (family room, office, closets, basement, etc.) and Duck brand will provide you with a shopping list to print or share. Or, you can simply purchase the recommended moving products right then and there through duckbrand.com.

While moving will always contain some stress, the right moving supplies and strategies can streamline the task of packing.

Source: duckbrand.com/move-ship.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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7 Pool Safety Questions to Ask Yourself

June 7, 2017 12:36 am

Splash! That’s the sound of summer fun as you dive into your beautiful blue pool. But while pools can be relaxing and refreshing, they can also be dangerous.According to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, there were an average of 3,536 fatal unintentional drownings per year between 2005 and 2014, which breaks down to about ten deaths per day.

If you own your own pool, it’s important to follow rigid safety guidelines to make sure you, your family and your guests are safe this summer

To start, Doug Zanes, an Arizona accident and injury lawyer, suggests you please ask yourself the following questions:

- Does your pool or spa have a fence around it?
- Are you pool gates self-closing and self-latching?
- Have you installed door, gate, or pool alarms?
- Have you installed anti-entrapment drain covers to protect swimmers?
- Are all pool and spa covers in working order?
- Has your family received CPR training?
- Does everyone in you family know how to swim?

If you own a pool, Zane notes that your answer to all of the above questions should be "yes."  Below, he offers seven safety tips that you must adopt.

Do not allow anyone to swim alone. Swim with a buddy because even adults can have a medical emergency requiring help;

- Your children must be taught basic water safety tips;
- In order to avoid entrapments, keep children away from pool drains;
- When people are using a pool or spa keep a telephone and other pool safety equipment close by;
- Look for any missing children in the pool or spa FIRST;
- An adult should maintain constant supervision of children swimming in the pool. Don't trust the life of a child to another child;
- Have young children or inexperienced swimmers wear U.S. Coast approved life jackets when in the pool.

Source: http://zaneslaw.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Stay Safe at the Dog Park

June 7, 2017 12:36 am

Dog parks are a fun way to socialize your dog, get some exercise, and meet some cute pooches along the way. However, dog parks can also be dangerous, with so many unknown animals thrown into the mix.

As park visits increase during the warm summer months, Nationwide reminds dog owners about the importance of safety when visiting their favorite dog park.

- Obey all posted rules and regulations.

- Visit the dog park without your dog during the days and times you anticipate going to see if the "regulars" are a good fit for your pet.

- Pay attention to your dog at all times and ensure that playtime remains friendly. If your dog or another dog is playing too rough, it's best to remove your dog from the situation.

- Many dog parks have designated areas for large and small dogs. No matter your dog's stature, be sure to keep them in the area allocated for their size.

- Don't bring a puppy younger than 4 months old.

- Make sure your dog is up to date on vaccinations and flea/tick preventive.

- On warm days, avoid the dog park during peak temperature hours.

- Bring water and a bowl for your dog to drink from.

- Look for signs of overheating, including profuse and rapid panting, a bright red tongue, thick drooling saliva, glassy eyes and lack of coordination. If this occurs, take your dog to a veterinarian immediately.

Source: Nationwide pet insurance
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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