RE/MAX 440
Mary Mastroeni
mmastroeni@remax.net
Mary Mastroeni
731 W Skippack Pike
Blue Bell  PA 19422
PH: 610-277-2900
O: 215-643-3200
C: 610-213-4878
F: 267-354-6212 
Welcome Home from RE/MAX 440!

Mary's Blog

Green Bunny: Tips for Filling Eco-Easter Baskets

March 6, 2012 7:50 pm

Easter is on its way! In preparation, Surf Sweets®, a leading brand of organically sweetened candy, unleashed a bevy of worker bunnies onto the net in search of the top eight eco-friendly Easter basket tips and treats for under $20.

“More and more parents are looking for better-for-you, more natural options for treating their families,” says Bert Cohen, President and Founder of TruSweets, LLC. “Our Surf Sweets team is no different,” he adds. “As parents ourselves, we’re always looking for unique products for our families that are made by like-minded companies committed to making ‘better for you’ products that help our planet.”

The Surf Sweets team assembled this list of eco-friendly and organic items you might want to put in your eco-Easter baskets this holiday season:
1. A tisket, a tasket, buy just one Easter basket. It’s smart to invest in just one Easter basket per child and reuse them year after year. Buying new baskets each year can be wasteful. Better yet, repurpose an old basket with a fresh coat of paint. Whatever you do, avoid buying a basket made from petroleum-based plastic.
2. Shred your own Easter grass. We have a great new use for your shredder…Easter basket grass. Prevent landfills from filling up post-Easter season with fake plastic grass by shredding grass yourself with old newspapers or magazines.
3. End Easter egg emission. Petroleum-based plastic Easter eggs generate tons of emission and landfill waste each year. Consider a switch to Eco Eggs—made from corn starch instead of petroleum-based polymers—and reduce your carbon footprint. They are made from non-toxic, durable plastic, have a tight snapping closure and are fully compostable after use. They come in five assorted colors: pink, yellow, green, blue, and purple. Try the 48-ct box for only $15.
4. Get your eco artist on. Clementine Art offers modeling clay, paints and crayons that are all natural, certified non-toxic and environmentally friendly, all for under $14. Even the packaging is made from 100 percent post-consumer recycled and reusable materials.
5. Who ate the sidewalk chalk? Conceptualized and crafted by a mom and artist, Edible Veggie Sidewalk Chalk is lead-free and made with vegan, organic food-based ingredients including beets, spinach and blueberries. It’s fun to draw with and tastes good too. It contains no wheat, sugar or preservatives. Available in Original and Swirl for $12.
6. Jump BPA-free double-dutch. What could be better for the planet than crisscrosses and double-unders when they are done with a BPA-Free Plastic Jump Rope? For only $10.99, this eco-jumper is made with USA made, 100 percent organic cotton rope (7 feet long and adjustable) and 100 percent recycled BPA-free plastic handles. Available in pink, purple and green.
7. Have 100 percent kid-powered fun. Whether reading under the covers, making fun shapes on the wall or finding your way in the dark, every child should have a flashlight – with no batteries. The $9.95 Hand-Powered Zoo Flashlights from Ecotronic are magical sources of light. With just a friendly squeeze it’s ready to light your child’s way into the night. One minute of squeezing gives 5 to 10 minutes of light. Available in four different animals: Tiger, Penguin, Monkey and Panda. No batteries mean less waste in landfills, which means less carbon in the atmosphere. Even the packaging is biodegradable.
8. Tap your child’s inner gardener. Young plant lovers can watch nature at work by growing a beautiful flower garden and fresh herbs in just days with the world’s most earth-happy gardening set. This Green Toys Indoor Gardening Kit is made from advanced environmentally friendly materials, helping to reduce fossil fuel use and CO2 emissions, all in the name of good green fun. The nine-piece kit includes a peapod-shaped planter tray, three planting pots, a trowel, soil and three packs of organic seeds (Teddy Bear Sunflower, Basil, Zinnia) with easy-to-follow planting instructions. Find it for only $19.50 at Amazon.

Source: http://www.surfsweets.com.

Tags:

Word of the Day

March 6, 2012 7:50 pm

Brokerage. Business of a broker. Also, the amount charged for a broker’s service.

Tags:

Question of the Day

March 6, 2012 7:50 pm

Q: What should I look for in a warranty from a remodeling contractor?

A: A well-written warranty document detailing specific information should be provided and incorporated as an addendum to the construction contract. Information should also be provided as to the procedure to follow for prompt warranty services, as well as what happens should a dispute arise over warranty issues.

Tags:

Question of the Day

March 5, 2012 7:50 pm

Q: How are individual property tax bills figured?

A: Unlike the income tax and the sales tax you pay, the property tax is not based on how much money you earn or how much you spend. It is based solely on how much the property you own is worth.

The real property tax is an ad valorem tax, or a tax based on the value of property.

Ideally, the owners of property of equal value pay the same amount of property taxes, and the owners of more valuable property pay more in taxes than the owners of less valuable property. The tax is calculated using a variety of formulas and is based on a property’s assessed value—its full market value or a percentage thereof –and the tax rate of the taxing jurisdiction, minus any property tax exemptions, such as those offered for the elderly or veterans.


Tags:

6 Easy Fixes for Common Home Problems

March 5, 2012 4:50 pm

You’ve just moved into your new home—or new to you, at least. But while the congratulations cards are still coming in, you begin to notice a few little flaws you never noticed earlier—like stains in the bathtub, or a dusty chandelier that may not have been cleaned since the day it was installed.

Never fear, say the home repair gurus at Real Simple magazine. Even novice homeowners can make simple repairs with the expertise of a professional. Here are easy fixes for six of common challenges that may face the novice homeowner:
• Bathtub stains – Combine equal parts cream of tartar and baking soda with enough lemon juice to make a paste. Rub the mixture into the stain with your fingers or a soft cloth. Let sit for half an hour, then rinse with warm water.
• Tub decals – Spray the decals and surrounding area with WD-40, lifting the edges to get underneath if possible. Let sit, then gently scrape away the decals using the edge of a credit card. Degrease the tub with liquid dishwashing soap.
• Dirty chandelier - Allow the fixture to cool. Wear a pair of white cotton gloves―one dry, one dampened with glass cleaner. (For crystal, use one part rubbing alcohol to three parts distilled water.) Wipe each prism first with the damp glove, then the dry one.
• Stuck sliding windows - A little silicone spray lubricant, sold at hardware stores, will grease the skids. Spray it onto a rag, then wipe along the tracks, whether they’re metal, wood, or plastic.
• Dried out cutting board - Revive by gently warming a bottle of pure mineral oil (available at drugstores) in a bowl of hot water, then wiping the oil onto the surface with a soft cloth. Wipe off the excess four to six hours later.
• Stuck-in light bulb - Press the center of a foot-long strip of duct tape onto the middle of the bulb. Fold each loose end in half so it sticks to itself. Gripping each end between your thumb and index finger, give a counterclockwise twist to loosen the bulb.

Tags:

Clean Up Tips for after the Tornadoes

March 5, 2012 4:50 pm

Recent tornadoes tore through the Midwest, leaving tons of homeowners responsible for cleaning up the aftermath.

The Restoration Industry Association provides the following tips for individuals impacted by the storms:
• Notify your insurance company of the loss.
• Keep a notebook to track dates and times of conversations with individuals pertaining to your claim.
• Secure buildings to prevent vandalism or further damage from weather. Most insurance policies require homeowners to take reasonable action to protect a property from further damage. Tarp or board up open spaces only if safe and appropriate.
• Shut off main water, gas and electricity supplies.
• Save receipts for meals, hotels, toiletries, replacement clothing, prescriptions, etc.
• Take photos of each room or area for future reference and insurance claims. This will provide a digital inventory of some visible contents.
• If electrical appliances, including televisions and computers are damaged, do not turn them back on when power is restored. This can result in electric shock and/or do further damage to the appliance. Electronics can often be cleaned & restored by contractors who know what they're doing.
• When it is safe to enter a property, look for valuables and important papers (e.g., birth/marriage certificates, wills, tax records, etc.)
• Beware of scammers offering restoration services. Check references thoroughly.
• Wear heavy rubber gloves or work gloves and thick-soled shoes, preferably not tennis shoes.
• Wash your hands frequently—especially before touching your face or eating.
• Be careful of sharp items such as broken glass, nails, etc. while searching debris.
• Drink lots of water to stay hydrated.
• Do not use bleach to disinfect since it is corrosive and can react with other substances. Use household disinfectants.
• Hard surfaces can be disinfected as well as some soft goods, depending on washability.
• Transport computers, art work and musical instruments to a dry environment.
• Damaged papers and books can be frozen temporarily to prevent further disintegration until they can be restored by a professional.
• Homeowners may hire any company they choose for restoration work, not just a company recommended by the insurance company.

Source: www.restorationindustry.org

Tags:

Stay on the Lookout for Shady Contractors Chasing Recent Storms

March 5, 2012 4:50 pm

In the wake of recent severe thunderstorms, wind and hail damage across the country, homeowners could now be faced with another disaster: unscrupulous storm-chasing contractors.

Storm chasers often go from house to house looking for people who need help cleaning up storm damage, offering promises of quick repairs for cash up-front.

“If a person you don’t know comes to your door promising to help if you’ll just pay in cash, just say ‘no,’” says Angie Hicks, founder of Angie’s List, which provides consumer reviews on local contractors and service companies. “Severe storms can be traumatic, and people trying to put their lives back together shouldn’t have to worry about trouble from shady contractors. With just a little research, you can find a reliable person who will get you back on the feet and keep you there.”

Roofs often take the brunt of the damage from storms, especially hail. Hail damage costs U.S. homeowners more than $1 billion in property damage each year. Only the destruction wrought by wind storms and tornadoes causes more damage, according to the National Weather Service. Be sure to know what your insurance policy covers in the event of hail damage. If you have damage, contact your agent as soon as possible.

Some storm-chasing roofing companies tell homeowners that they need their roof replaced, when it often just needs a few repairs. This is why hiring a company with a good reputation is so important, because few homeowners want to—or can—climb up on their roof and figure out what’s really needed.
“If your home suffers damage, get estimates from at least three licensed, local contractors with a good reputation,” Hicks says. “Understand that the best service companies are going to be the busiest, so patience is key. You might have to wait a little longer to get the work done, but you want to have it correctly the first time. You don’t want to get stuck paying for the same job to be done twice because you hired the first person to come knocking on your door offering help.”

Tips to avoid shady storm chasers:

• If a stranger comes to your storm-ravaged yard offering to repair your roof, remove trees or do other major repair work for cash upfront, just say no.
• Do your research: Check references and the status of the contractor’s bonding and liability insurance coverage.
• Don’t cave into pressure or scare tactics.
• High-quality tree services, plumbers, roofers and hauling companies are in high demand when storms hit. Beware the company with time on its hands when every other similar company can’t even answer the phones.
• Don't hire the first contractor who comes along and offers to do the job. Get at least three estimates to compare.
• Get estimates in writing and a contract that includes the project price, materials to be used and a timeline for completion.

Tips on what to do after a storm:

• Do a visual inspection: Look at your home, automobiles and other property exposed to the storm. Take a picture of any damage you find.
• Call at least three reputable contractors: Get apples to apples estimates for the repairs you need.
• Review your insurance policy: Ensure you know what you’re entitled to. Some insurance companies surcharge or up rate for any claim, therefore it is best to know if you have damage before you call.
• If there is damage: Call your insurance agent right away to file a claim.
• Check contractor credentials: Check that your contractor has a good reputation, is licensed, insured and can do the work.
• Get it in writing: Expect to pay a deposit for materials, but always get a contract in writing that discusses payment terms. Make sure the contract includes a termination clause, should the contractor fail to meet your guidelines. Never pay cash in advance for work.

Source: www.angieslist.com

Tags:

Spend Less and Live More

March 5, 2012 4:50 pm

Are your family finances tight? Do you cringe when your kids start a new season of baseball or ballet because you know you are about to cough up $300 in gear?

Raising children can be expensive—but it doesn’t always have to be, according to Kate Raidt , author of The Million-Dollar Parent. Raidt, who is featured in Parents, Parenting and Woman’s Day magazines, suggests the following four tips to help your family enjoy the fun things in life but also relieve the financial stress that comes with raising children:

1. Ask for hand-me-downs. From sports gear to ballet apparel, Raidt suggests always asking for hand-me-downs. “When my daughter needed tap shoes ($60 a pair), I found a mom in the class before us whose daughter had just outgrown her tap shoes and she gave them to us for free! When we needed ballet shoes, the dance studio had an entire box full of donations and lost-and-found that they were selling for $2. Ask other parents or the sports league for used gear—and you will always find a better deal (or free) rather than buying these things new,” writes Raidt.

2. Babysitting Swaps. Raidt saves money on babysitting by finding arranging babysitting swaps. To do this, find a family with children of similar ages and swapbabysitting duties every now and then; one week, you will watch their kids while they go out together. Next time, they will watch yours. “Not only did this spruce up our marriage by having more “alone time” but we have not spent a penny on a babysitter in years. We have saved over $3,000 per year by implementing babysitting swaps!”

3. Tap Natural Resources. In most cities, tap water—especially once it’s been filtered—is perfectly healthy to drink. “Today’s families are drinking far too many sodas, juices and sports drinks and not nearly enough water anyways. So save money, calories, tooth decay, diabetes and obesity by drinking tap water in lieu of sugary drinks,” writes Raidt.

4. Reuse. Getting second-hand clothes, toys and furniture is a great way to save money and go green. “By shopping at yard sales, you pay 5 cents on the dollar what you would pay at a store—and you are the only person who knows it’s not brand new. Also, every family should have a yard sale of their own twice per year to clear out the clutter,” writes Raidt.

Source: http://www.swparents.com/

Tags:

Word of the day

March 2, 2012 4:48 pm

Blockbusting. Illegal practice of creating panic selling in a neighborhood for financial gain. Typically exploits racial and religious bias to get homeowners to sell low so the properties can be resold at a mark up.

Tags:

Question of the Day

March 2, 2012 4:48 pm

Q: When remodeling, what cost controls or budgeting ideas might be helpful?

A: Plan ahead and create a realistic budget. Decide on the items and materials you would like to have in a room and set your budget accordingly. This will prevent hasty, and costly, decisions down the road. The experts suggest setting aside 10-20% of your budget to cover unforeseen problems and miscellaneous charges. Then, choose less expensive products that will help you achieve the look you’re trying to obtain. Avoid labor intensive design features, such as tiled floors. You may also want to pursue your home improvement in stages, if you can’t afford to pay for the entire project at once. Also, purchase surplus, secondhand, or discounted materials from other contractors, warehouses or classified websites like www.build.recylce.net to reduce costs. If possible, avoid too many take-out meals and/or hotel stays. Try isolating construction areas so that your living space isn’t interrupted and other household space can be used to heat or prepare meals once the kitchen is being remodeled.

Tags:
TwitterFacebookGoogleLinkedinYoutubepinterest