RE/MAX 440
Mary Mastroeni
mmastroeni@remax.net
Mary Mastroeni
731 W Skippack Pike
Blue Bell  PA 19422
PH: 610-277-2900
O: 215-643-3200
C: 610-213-4878
F: 267-354-6212 
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Mary's Blog

Most Americans Are without a Financial Back-up Plan

July 22, 2011 4:59 pm

If the unexpected happens and a major life crisis occurs, most Americans today would be unprepared to handle the impact. These findings are detailed in the new State Farm® "Financial Plan B" survey. In the study, while 81 percent of all adults say having a back-up plan is very important, only 45 percent say they've actually planned ahead and are ready to weather a life crisis. 

"People naturally think the unexpected happens to somebody else. But setbacks can hit anyone and people need to be ready. Regrettably, most are not," says Joe Monk, senior vice president and chief administrative officer, State Farm Life Insurance Company. "With the economic downturn and concerns about continued slow growth, it's critically important that people take a clear-eyed look at their financial situation and develop realistic options they can have in place should unexpected financial difficulties pop up." 

The survey also shows that the pressure to have back-up plans is intensifying because whatever "rainy-day funds" people once had are now challenged in the wake of the economic downturn. In the survey, 35 percent of Americans say they have funds on hand to meet financial needs for just three months or fewer, with 15 percent lacking funds to meet commitments beyond a single month. Not surprisingly, in the event of a job loss, many respondents say they would accept a large salary reduction simply to restore household cash flow. Fifty-four percent indicate they would accept a lower paying job if they were out of work for six months or fewer. 

The telephone survey, conducted for State Farm by Harris Interactive®, asked people to consider their financial readiness in the face of a major life crisis such as loss of a job, a divorce, the unexpected death of a spouse or partner, or a catastrophic illness that leaves someone unable to earn an income. The survey was conducted from May 6, 2011 to May 16, 2011 among a nationally representative sample of 2,017 U.S. adults aged 18 and older. 

Not Ready, Not Realistic
The survey also found that many people may have a false sense of security when it comes to the adequacy of the plans they have embraced to prepare for the unexpected. In the survey, 69 percent say they feel well prepared or somewhat prepared in the event of a major life crisis. Yet in looking at the actual elements of people's back-up plans, many "go-to" options create just as many problems as they solve. 

• Sixty-one percent indicate they would take money from a 401(k) or other employer-sponsored retirement savings vehicle as part of their Plan B. Thirty-four percent would downsize their home and 22 percent would move in with family.
• Sixty-eight percent of people 55 or older say it is likely that they would take on an additional job if necessary.
• Fifty-eight percent of adults who have a financial back-up plan say it is not written down and only exists in their heads.

"For many people, their current Plan B's don't provide the kind of safety net they ultimately need," says Monk. "Taking money from a 401(k) creates more vulnerability later in life, homes are not the piggybanks they once were, and not all people are in the position to take in extended family.
"Working multiple jobs also is not realistic for many Americans as they age," adds Monk. "Most sobering is the fact that most people don't have back-up plans that are written down and documented, which means they often come up with solutions in the midst of a crisis—seldom the best time for clear, stress-free thinking." 

Plan A's Suffering Too
The survey indicates many assumptions about retirement once thought to be unshakable also are coming under pressure. When asked, just fewer than a quarter of future retirees think they will be able to retire at age 60. Nearly one-quarter doubt they'll ever be able to retire. Additionally, slightly more than six in 10 Americans say they will not be able to retire without Social Security and/or Medicare being available as they exist today. 

Given these rising uncertainties, State Farm recommends people consider the following tips to ward off the damaging effects that unexpected life events can have on savings and retirement plans: 

• Start the conversation with loved ones. Financial planning conversations can be difficult and uncomfortable, but it's important to start them before you're faced with a crisis. Planning ahead for the unexpected can alleviate some of the stress you would otherwise experience.
• Work with someone you trust. Talk to your insurance agent or financial advisor about your Plan A—and your Plan B. If you don't know where to turn, ask your friends or family members to recommend someone they trust.
• Put your plan in writing. By committing a step-by-step plan to paper, you can prepare in advance and make more rational choices. And if something unexpected happens to you, others will know your wishes.

For more information, please visit www.statefarm.com.

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Word of the Day

July 22, 2011 4:59 pm

Contract. A legally enforceable agreement between two or more parties. To be valid, a real estate contract must be dated, in writing, include a consideration, have a description of the property, the place and date of delivery of the deed, and spell out all terms and conditions that were mutually agreed upon. It also must be executed (signed) by the buyer and seller.

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Question of the Day

July 22, 2011 4:59 pm

Q: Why do most homebuyers prefer a fixed-rate mortgage?

A: Long-term, fixed-rate mortgages are preferred by most homebuyers because they offer security and stability. The interest rate does not fluctuate over the life of the loan, so the total amount of principal and interest always remains the same. The monthly payment can change, however, if local property taxes, which are normally part of the monthly mortgage payment, increase.

Because the life of a fixed-term loan is usually long – anywhere from 15 to 30 years – you have plenty of time to repay it and there is no call provision written into the mortgage. A call allows the lender to demand the balance of the loan be paid in full before the actual payoff date.

On the negative side, the interest rate on a fixed mortgage is usually two or three full points above the current rate on an adjustable rate loan, at least initially. But for buyers seeking security, the comfort of knowing what their payments will be year after year, and no plans of selling their home in the foreseeable future, this is a small price to pay. If rates drop, they may be able to refinance their home loan and get a lower rate.


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Saving Strategies That Work

July 21, 2011 4:59 pm

If you find spending money a lot easier than saving it, you may need to back your way into some out-of-the-box savings strategies, say the financial mavens at Money Magazine, who offer seven ways you may not have thought about to help you build up emergency savings.

1. Do it without thinking – Set up an automatic deduction from checking into savings. Pick an amount you won’t miss—as little as two to five percent of your deposits—and you’ll be surprised at how quickly your savings can grow.
2. Keep paying yourself – When you pay off a long-term loan, continue paying that money into savings. The cash is there for you if you really need it, but adds up fast when paid into savings.
3. Avoid temptation – Just as a dieter can avoid the bakery, so should the shopper avoid the mall. If diversion is what you’re after, opt for the park instead of the mall.
4. Squash the impulse – Try the 24-hour rule: if you still need or want an item after a 24 hour wait, go get it. If not—it’s money saved. Can you bank it?
5. Save for little splurges – Save up for that day at the spa instead of booking it and paying with plastic. Knowing the bill won’t show up on your statement next month makes the splurge even sweeter.
6. Enjoy the compounding – Instead of paying interest on the interest as you pay down credit cards, you can actually enjoy compound interest for a change as you watch your money grow.
7. Reward yourself – Set savings goals, and give yourself a little reward each time you reach a goal level. A new outfit, a nice dinner out or a weekend away are sensible rewards to plan for.

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How to Stock Your Home Bar

July 21, 2011 4:59 pm

Entertaining is a summer essential, whether for family, neighbors, friends, or community members. When entertaining, a relaxed atmosphere and some easy appetizers are key, but nothing is more crucial than a well-stocked home bar, perfect for plans made last minute.

A home bar should reflect your tastes, but also cater to the preferences of your guests. That’s why it’s important to have a wide selection of choices.

Standards
Having the following popular choices on stand-by will prove handy for unexpected company:

• Red wine, stored in a cool dark place such as the basement
• White wine, chilled in the fridge
• Light summer beer, chilled in the fridge
• Dark beer, either in the fridge or stored in a cool dark place
• A non alcoholic selection or soda, juice or iced tea

Base Liquors
Be sure to have at least three types of base liquors on hand, such as:

• Gin
• Tequila
• Bourbon
• Rum
• Whiskey
• Scotch

Base Mixers
These can turn your vodka on the rocks into a tasty summer special:

• Bitters
• Vermouth
• Tonic
• Seltzer
• Soda (diet and non)
• Juice, such as orange, cranberry or pomegranate

Tools
You don’t have to be a seasoned bartender to make a good drink. The following tools will help you make a variety of beverages:

• Medium sized cocktail shaker
• Glasses, including scotch, martini, red and white wine
• Wine and beer opener
• Ice bucket

Extras
The following accoutrement will take your drinks to the next level:

• Olives
• Lemons
• Limes
• Ice, either plain or with mint or fresh fruit frozen inside

The great thing about a well stocked home bar is that most things—beer, wine, hard mixers and juices—keep for a long time if left unopened. This means you won’t need to make a trip to the store if unexpected company arrives, and will be one less thing on your list while planning your next party or event.


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Sleep Tips Website Recommends against New Products to Sleep or Stay Awake

July 21, 2011 4:59 pm

Convenience store shelves have long featured a variety of products to give consumers a jolt of personal energy. Lately, they’re being joined by a new class of products like herbal sodas and melatonin-laced brownies that are designed to help stressed-out people relax at the end of the day. One of the web's premier sleep websites is recommending against the use of these products. 

“They may sound like a good idea, but all of that chemical stimulation and tranquilizing can interfere with healthy sleeping patterns,” says Dan Schecter, vice president of Consumer Products at Carpenter Co. and creator of SleepBetter.org. “All those uppers and downers are no substitute for regular natural rest.”
“Don’t get me wrong,” continues Schecter. “There’s nothing wrong with a cup of coffee in the morning or some soothing chamomile tea in the evening. But in our go-go culture, people are tempted to rely too much on these ‘energy products,’ especially when some of the products are being promoted in multi-million dollar marketing campaigns.” 

SleepBetter.org offers these natural, non-pharmaceutical strategies to promote beneficial and healthy sleep:
• Set regular times for going to sleep and waking-up, even on weekends
• Create a dark, cool and quiet environment in the bedroom
• Make sure bedding is clean, fresh and appropriate for the season and that pillows and mattress provide support
• As bedtime approaches, avoid stimulating activities like video games and using the computer
• A little light reading at bedtime is fine, but don’t put your brain into overdrive with a suspenseful thriller

For more tips to help you sleep better, visit http://sleepbetter.org.

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The Cost of Not Paying Attention

July 21, 2011 4:59 pm

Three out of every four motorists are focusing on something other than driving, while driving, according to a 2010 poll conducted by Leger Marketing. With the aim of shedding light on the fact that dangerous driving isn’t limited to the standard categories of speeding or drunk driving, InsuranceHotline.com, a non-biased insurance rate comparison service, is drawing attention to the lesser known distracted driving list to help inform consumers about safety and its impact on insurance. 

InsuranceHotline.com has compiled a list of seven driving distractions as a reminder to drivers on what to avoid or be aware of while on the road:
1. Using a cell phone — even though there are laws and legislation in many cities, people still have the tendency to use their cell phone while driving. If you are talking or texting and are involved in an auto accident, you could be charged with “careless driving with undo care and attention,” and could face a serious conviction that comes with a fine of up to $1,000. This type of conviction, coupled with all the implications that are tied to an auto accident, could impact your automobile insurance premium by thousands of dollars every year for at least six years.
2. Eating and drinking — anything, from drinking hot coffee which can spill to eating fast food, can divert the driver’s attention away from the road and increases the chances of a collision.
3. Grooming — applying makeup and even shaving while behind the wheel, means a drivers’ attention is taken away from the road and decrease their ability to apply defensive driving techniques.
4. Reading/writing — yes that’s right, even a GPS system that’s been attached to the dashboard can pose a potential danger as it can take the drivers eyes away from the road. A split second is all it takes!
5. Outside distractions — everything from billboards to movies in other vehicles; it’s easy to get distracted and it’s important to always maintain focus while driving.
6. Animals/pets – as much as pets can be a companion on those long road trips, having a pet block your rear view or a barking dog can be a distraction, so it’s important to have them in a proper crate while driving to avoid any safety hazards.
7. Passenger distractions – maintaining focus while driving with screaming children or emotional passengers can be a difficult task. Remaining calm is essential for the safety of both the driver and fellow passengers. 

“Most people don’t consider minor distractions behind the wheel, such as children or pets as dangerous driving; however, at fault accidents, regardless of the cause, can affect consumer’s rates in a negative manner.” explains Tammy Ezer, Marketing Director, InsuranceHotline.com. 

For more information, please visit www.InsuranceHotline.com.

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Word of the Day

July 21, 2011 4:59 pm

Construction loan. Type of loan where money is doled out as construction takes place; borrower must obtain a permanent long-term mortgage from another source to repay the construction loan. Also called an interim loan.

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Question of the Day

July 21, 2011 4:59 pm

Q: How do you choose a good condo?

A: Seek ownership in a well-maintained building, and pay special attention to the financial health of the condo association. Lax maintenance may be a sign of financial trouble, which could result in higher maintenance fees and problems trying to resale the property later.

Things to consider:
• Get a copy of the latest financial statement from the condo association.
• Ask the board of directors – which is elected by the unit owners from among themselves – if major repairs or improvements are imminent. If so, find out how much they will cost and whether there is enough money in the reserve to cover them.
• Check the by-laws, rules and the covenants, codes and restrictions (CC&Rs). You may find, among other things, that they prohibit or restrict pets and the renting of units. Some may require that the board have the right of first refusal on the sale of any unit.
• Learn everything you can about the homeowners association, including legal disputes and conflicts. Start by reading the minutes of the association meetings.
• Find out the owner-to-tenant ratio. Because many condominiums are often purchased as investments, there could be a high percentage of tenants in the building.

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Word of the Day

July 20, 2011 7:59 pm

Consideration. Something of value, usually money, given to induce another to enter into a contract.

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